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realniggaannouncements:

I had a dream last night that Jesus finally resurrected and when white people found out he wasn’t white they arrested him for 2000 something years of tax invasion  

(via pepperminttealeaves)

"My grandfather always said that living is like licking honey off a thorn."

- Louis Adamic  (via weaverofstars)

(Source: wordpainting, via bishophouseofhorrors)

grlgang:

pimpunderthemountain:

vriska:

spookyroxi:

treatboss:

THIS INSTRUMENT IS CALLED THE KALIMBA. THIS IS FATE.

holy shit

this is the best kalimba playing i’ve ever seen EVER

I HAD NO IDEA WHAT A KALIMBA LOOKED LIKE UNTIL JUST THIS SECOND IM BLOWN AWAY

I had one of these growing up and I was such shit at it I literally have never heard one used for anything other than plonky, labored renditions of ‘twinkle twinkle little star’ in my living room. This is gorgeous.

I feel that things like this are posted so often with no historical information and I think that’s pretty damaging even if it’s unintentional. It just contributes to the erasure of non-western societies and their cultures.
The Kalimba is an African instrument common throughout Sub-Saharan Africa and it’s also known as the “sansa” and “mbira”. It was typically played while walking by traveling “griots” who keep the history of the tribe or village and for entertainment purposese. And get this: the wood or bamboo-tiled instruments were first invented 3000 years ago! And the metal-tiled ones appeared in the Zambezi River Valley 1,300 years ago. There’s so much history behind this instrument and it’s an injustice to the those whose culture it originates from to post about it and never once mention them. Anyway this is just tiny bit of the history I felt like adding from the wiki page, and the entire thing it very interesting so I’d encourage you to read it all!

(Source: neetboss, via sureshorty)

unhistorical:

Gabriel García Márquez Dead: Nobel Prize-Winning Author Dies At 87 (TIMENew York Times)

Colombian Nobel laureate Gabriel García Márquez was the author of One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967), Autumn of the Patriarch (1975), Love in the Time of Cholera (1985), in addition to many other novels, short stories, and non-fiction works. In 1982 he received the Nobel Prize in Literature for “his novels and short stories, in which the fantastic and the realistic are combined in a richly composed world of imagination, reflecting a continent’s life and conflicts.” García Márquez, only the fourth of six Latin Americans to be awarded the literature prize since its inception in 1901, lamented: “they have taken into account the literature of the sub-continent and have awarded me as a way of awarding all of this literature.” In his acceptance speech, entitled “The Solitude of Latin America”, García Márquez addressed the postcolonial struggles of Latin American nations, and the willing embrace by European institutions of Latin American cultural expression but not its social realities:

Latin America neither wants, nor has any reason, to be a pawn without a will of its own; nor is it merely wishful thinking that its quest for independence and originality should become a Western aspiration. However, the navigational advances that have narrowed such distances between our Americas and Europe seem, conversely, to have accentuated our cultural remoteness. Why is the originality so readily granted us in literature so mistrustfully denied us in our difficult attempts at social change? Why think that the social justice sought by progressive Europeans for their own countries cannot also be a goal for Latin America, with different methods for dissimilar conditions? 

(via fuegosdeoctubree)

(Source: jaz-led, via chestnut-nest)